The Word for Maundy Thursday: Jesus in the Garden

Matthew 26:36-36 (NASB) Then Jesus came with them to a place called Gethsemane, and said to His disciples, “Sit here while I go over there and pray.” And He took with Him Peter and the two sons of Zebedee, and began to be grieved and distressed. Then He said to them, “My soul is deeply grieved, to the point of death; remain here and keep watch with Me.”

And He went a little beyond them, and fell on His face and prayed, saying, “My Father, if it is possible, let this cup pass from Me; yet not as I will, but as You will.” And He came to the disciples and found them sleeping, and said to Peter, “So, you men could not keep watch with Me for one hour? Keep watching and praying that you may not enter into temptation; the spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak.”

He went away again a second time and prayed, saying, “My Father, if this cannot pass away unless I drink it, Your will be done.” Again He came and found them sleeping, for their eyes were heavy. And He left them again, and went away and prayed a third time, saying the same thing once more.  Then He came to the disciples and said to them, “Are you still sleeping and resting? Behold, the hour is at hand and the Son of Man is being betrayed into the hands of sinners. Get up, let us be going; behold, the one who betrays Me is at hand!”

Go Deeper

Matthew’s gospel is not the only one to recount the events of that evening, of the last supper or Jesus with the disciples in the garden of Gethsemane praying before his betrayal and arrest.

Bible.org examines three passages side by side and examines them in detail. If you want to go deeper today into the events of that night, I recommend this helpful article.

Blog Anniversary Giveaway Number 1: Four Great Christian Resources

discernment books

I promised giveaways this month and this one is extra special to celebrate four years of blogging. One lucky commenter will get a copy of The Truth War by John MacArthur, “Another Jesus” Calling by Warren Smith, Is That You Lord? by Gary Gilley and Herman Who? a Hermeneutics primer DVD from Wretched.

To enter – simply comment here, tweet me @SteakandaBible and let me know you’re entering or comment on this post on my new Facebook page. (Like the page while you’re there please!) You have roughly a week to enter. I’ll pick a winner by Wednesday morning next week (March 16, 2016). Continue reading

Resources for New Year’s Resolutioners (and Everybody Else)

It’s that time of year when some people make resolutions. Many say they’ll give up a bad habit, or try to start a new one. But if your goals for the year are about your relationship with Jesus Christ here are some resources that might help.

If your resolution is to read the Bible (more of it or just to read it more regularly): check out this list at Challies.com of different Bible reading plans to find one that will work for you. Also, pick a reliable translation of the Bible — not an agenda-driven one or a terrible paraphrase like The Message. Continue reading

Don’t Miss List: Meditation, Reformation and More

How to Discern Between Biblical Meditation and the Unbiblical Kind

As new age meditation becomes commonplace in our culture it is imperative that we Christians understand the difference between what the Bible means when it says to meditate on God’s word and eastern and dangerous religious practices that are so popular today. Marsha West tackles meditation and what is biblical at Stand Up for the Truth. Continue reading

A “Balanced Diet” of Scripture

A helpful point from Jen Wilkin’s book, Women of the Word.

After explaining a particular problem of being a biblical “picky eater,” by only reading or studying certain parts of the Bible on page 44 Wilkin writes:

“All Scripture is God-breathed and profitable. All of it. We need a balanced diet to grow to maturity — it’s time to move on to the rest of the meal.  Women need both male and female examples to point us to godliness. We can’t fully appreciate the sweetness of the New Testament without the savory of the Old Testament. We need historical narrative, poetry, wisdom literature, law, prophecy, and parables all showing us the character of God from different angles …”