Celebrating Reformation 500

Today is the 500th Anniversary of the Protestant Reformation, recalling the day Martin Luther posted his 95 Theses on the Wittenberg Church door. Of course, other reformers came before him and many came after him. But this day in 1517 was certainly a watershed moment in history and the one we most remember.

In honor of that here is a series of messages I’ve been listening to on key theological tenets that the reformation recovered. These particular messages are from First Baptist Church of Manhattan, but there are many churches doing similar series to mark Reformation 500.

Soli Deo Gloria (only for God’s glory)

Sola Scriptura  (Scripture is our authority)

Solus Christus (Christ alone)

Sola Fide (Faith alone)

Sola Gratia (Grace alone)

Yes, God Speaks … Through His Word

“You do not need another special revelation from God outside the Bible. You can listen to the voice of God every day. Christ still speaks, because the Spirit has already spoken. If you want to hear from God, go to the book that records only what he has said. Immerse yourself in the word of God. You will not find anything more sure.”

Rev. Kevin DeYoung from Taking God at His Word

One of the Most Essential Messages I’ve Ever Heard

Estimating conservatively, I’ve listened to hundreds of podcasts and sermons in my life. Many have edified me, convicted me or taught me. But the sermon/lecture in the latter half of this episode of Fighting for the Faith is one of the best and most important I’ve ever listened to. I hope many of you decide to listen to it. Continue reading

The Reformers: Martin Luther

It makes sense to begin these few posts about the Reformers with the most well-known: Martin Luther. But before that, I’d like to say that my intention here is not to revere these men. They were all men. Sinners, just like the rest of us. But I think it is important to remember them and the impact they had on Christianity by God’s grace. Continue reading

Remembering the Reformers

Although I do not consider myself Reformed in the theological sense of the word (I share some of those views, but not all of them), I still look upon the Protestant Reformation with gratitude for the men God used to fight for truth, for the recovery of the gospel and especially the principle of the Bible being the “ultimate authority” for Christians (Sola Scriptura). Continue reading